Archive for October, 2011
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The Hidden Eco-Benefits of Working from Home
Some time ago I posted on how we built a home office in an storage old barn using reclaimed materials. And I have to say that working from home is one of my favorite thing about my current job(s). Every now and then, of course, we hear of studies that claim that telecommuting is more polluting than working from an office—studies that Lloyd usually debunks in pretty short order. But nevertheless these get me thinking—telecommuting has way more eco-benefits than just saving on gas from your commute. Here are a few of my favorites. (Yes, some of them involve peeing.) Peeing in Your Yard: Not many offices are equipped with a waterless urinal, but my home office certainly is. It’s called my yard. And by peeing on my mulch I even get an unput of nutrients for my sadly neglected garden. I could argue that there is less demand for... Continue Reading
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‘Poop’ Power
Maryland is seeking proposals for the purchase of electricity generated from animal waste like poultry litter and livestock manure, the governor’s office announced on Thursday. Eligible energy suppliers must have a capacity of up to 10 megawatts, connect directly to the grid and be able to begin providing power to the state by Dec. 31, 2015. While the idea of poo-derived power may sound unconventional, Maryland isn’t the only state that’s giving it a second look. Through a pilot case study conducted by its Cow Power program, the state of Vermont produced 12 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year by... Continue Reading
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CooKit solar panel cooker
Panel solar cookers are the first solar cookers that are truly affordable to the world’s neediest. In 1994, a volunteer group of engineers and solar cooks associated with Solar Cookers International developed and produced the CooKit, based on a design by French scientist Roger Bernard. Elegant and deceptively simple looking, it is an affordable, effective and convenient solar cooker. With a few hours of sunshine, the CooKitmakes tasty meals for 5-6 people at gentle temperatures, cooking food and preserving nutrients without burning or drying out. Larger families use two or more cookers. The CooKit is made of cardboard and foil... Continue Reading
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Why People Should Act More Like Whales
Song of the Spindle is a funny and surprisingly insightful conversation between a man and a whale. It turns out that humans and whales have more in common than one might expect; for example, certain species of whales have spindle neurons — considered to be “the brain cells that make us human.” Seattle-based animator Drew Christie talks about his creative process and recommends a few whale-related books in an interview below. The Atlantic: How did you get into illustration and animation? Drew Christie: I have been drawing since as long as I can remember. My dad used to paint and draw for... Continue Reading
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Doing good helps companies do well
Award nominees cited for their business practices, but also appreciated for the benefits they bring to their communities They may be small, but that doesn’t mean they have small hearts. Three of the nominees for Small Business of the Year for Small Business Week 2011 don’t let the fact they only have a handful of employees stop them from trying to make a big impact in the community. The Residential Electric Contractor Company – or TRECC Electric for short – helps build houses for Habitat for Humanity. Calgary‘s Child Magazine helps raise money for respite care for parents. And Sure... Continue Reading
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Bob Marley’s activist granddaughter in MTL for world premiere of her new Rasta doc at FNC
“It is difficult to be a Marley and it is [also] not difficult to live up to the Marley name because I am who I am,” says Donisha Prendergast, the 25-year-old documentary filmmaker and granddaughter of global music icon Bob Marley. “People expect things from me just because I am a Marley. Some have good expectations and others have bad expectations. Sometimes people expect me to be a diva. But I don’t deal with all that celebrity stuff. It’s not necessary for me.” Prendergast is in Montreal this week for the world premiere at the 40th annual Festival du Nouveau... Continue Reading
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Today is International Day for the Eradication of Poverty – And Who Listens to the Poor?
When we think of the poor, we think in broad strokes. We think of a village devastated by a hurricane or a group of faceless beggars on the street or daily wage laborers huddled over a field. But the poor are not one entity. Far from it, they are Farida, who feared her dark skin led to a bad marriage, or Indu, a member of India’s marginalized tribal community, or Sukhibala, whose husband will not let her work outside the house. The voices of the poor are often forgotten when it comes to international development.  These voices are often drowned... Continue Reading
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Ethical Halloween Candy That Doesn’t Suck
Trick or treat? Each Halloween, American kids dress like ghouls, hit the streets, and collect as much candy as their pillowcases can carry. But behind those fun-size treats lies some real horror: Most chocolate producers rely on cocoa at least partially harvested by child slaves. In recent years, select fair-trade manufacturers have gained traction in the chocolate marketplace by eliminating child laborers from their supply chains. But most fair-trade companies don’t market their candies to kids. A hippie-dippy dark-chocolate bar isn’t a very valuable commodity when all the other kids on the block are trading king-size Butterfingers. But there are some offbeat... Continue Reading
Gift of giving: Singer's book identifies the trustworthy charities.
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Ethics Matter: A Conversation with Peter Singer
Ethics Matter Series Peter Singer, Julia Taylor Kennedy InterviewPeterSinger.mp3 Having trouble with audio or video playback? Click here Utilitarian philosopher Peter Singer lives up to his beliefs, giving away 25-30 percent of his income to alleviate absolute poverty, and defending animal rights–or as he puts it, “extending equality beyond the species boundary.” Here are his thoughts on these topics and more. Since 1999 he has been Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. Visit: thelifeyoucansave.com for more info Original article: (http://www.carnegiecouncil.org) Related articles Peter Singer on Henry Sidgwick’s Ethics (3quarksdaily.com) Does... Continue Reading
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